This Christmas, Where Should You Go In Australia?

This Christmas, Where Should You Go In Australia

The year is almost over. That’s by all means, good news. It may have been a good year for you and your colleagues at work; you and your partners in business; and most importantly, you and your family. On the contrary, it may have been a bad year – one that has seen you going through challenges and heartaches that make you cringe each time you remember them. Whatever the case, it is a good idea to visit somewhere new this year end. It could be for self-reflection purposes, introspection or just to reminisce the good times you had from January. So yes, go somewhere new and celebrate Christmas at the same time. Book minibus charter in Australia to make travelling more convenient!

Victoria’s Northeast

Many consider Victoria a perfect summer destination. While this is true, it is also worth noting that Victoria offers much more than just summer getaways. Victoria’s Northeast doubles as a perfect winter and summer playground. Bright and Mount Beauty stand out as two of the main destinations Victoria has to offer. With more than 94 km of clean, sealed path along an old railway line that runs from Bright to Wangaratta, Bright Rail Trail is by far a hiker’s fantasy.  

Bright also boasts of several eateries with local and exotic menus for food lovers. Emu Tourist Farm as well as Snowline Deer can easily be accessed from Bright. The two tourist attractions are perfect for families with children. They can feed emus and red deer or take farm tours in US Army WWII Scout Cars.  

There are wineries for wine lovers, which are also kid-friendly. As parents enjoy some wine tasting, children can run around enjoying the beautiful scenery and making friends with the locals. Mount Bogong and Ceccanti are two of the area’s main wineries. Both specialize in pinot noir, cool climate wines. Be sure to also try bird watching with county tours in the area, fishing on Kiewa River or night-time wildlife spotting.

Lake Mungo National Park

Christmas in a National park may sound like something only a few privileged individuals can enjoy. That’s not true because you can too. Visit Lake Mungo National Park this Christmas and have a firsthand experience discovering the world’s oldest fossils. The park, which is part of the Willandra Lakes World Heritage Area is tucked in New South Wales eastern part. It is home to the longest physical records of old Aboriginal life that dates from 60,000 years ago.

Walk on what was once a 135 square kilometre freshwater lake before it completely dried up nearly 14,000 years ago. By the time your tours are over, you will have learnt about bush tucker plants, rare herbs and medicines. There’s also so much to learn at the Mungo National Park Visitor Information Centre, where a historic woolshed, built by Chinese Labourers centuries ago, greet tourists. There’s also what tour guides call Great Walls of China. They are breathtaking 30 kilometre crescent shape or white sand dunes that conceal rare samples of middens, cooking hearths and burial sites. On your way back to Wentworth, learn about the interesting way of life of the local Barkindji people.

Explore Lord Howe Island

No island offers a perfect laidback family holiday better than Lord Howe. The island is a splendid paradise for children and young adults, offering activities such as snorkelling, fishing, swimming, bike riding and bush walking. Youngsters can enjoy lagoon beaches where turquoise blue waters lap the shell strewn white sands of the island beach.

Cycle with your loved ones or walk with a backpack of fresh barbecue supplies for lunch. Feel free to stroll through quiet palm forests or play a round of golf with your peers on the island’s nine-hole golf course. Extroverts and the ever outgoing can cruise around the island to experience picturesque views of Mounts Lidgbird and Gower.

There’s something for nature lovers too, courtesy of Howe Island’s rare fauna and flora, both of which can be seen up close on tours with local guides like Ian Hutton. The same can also be studied on guidebooks from different lookout points on Lord Howe, which are mostly surrounded by breathtaking coral reefs. Admiralty Islands and Mutton Bird Island can both be seen with ease from Howe Island, so be sure to pack your binoculars.  You will mostly likely return to the island the following Christmas to see turtles swimming in crystal clear waters or even for the delicious food you only get to enjoy while at the Island.

Esperance

Some describe it as the world’s best secret family destination. Others describe it as the most breathtaking getaway for couples. Still, others refer it for busy working executives who want to take a break from it all – the hustle and bustle of the city and ever busy schedules. One thing is for sure though – Esperance is all you need this Christmas. Travel 720 km southeast of Perth to find this rare family destination gem, which is hard and almost impossible to beat.

Tourists like to call the beaches here ‘secret south’. It is a coastline with just about everything – from scenic beaches and islands to wildlife and lush greenery that highlight Esperance’s flora and fauna, there is no way you will get bored here. Kangaroos can be spotted sunbathing on the beach, with rare birds flying by.

Accommodation here is something to marvel at with holiday units, plenty of campsites, cabins and apartments. Spend time at the beach, visit a giant aquarium with a touch of marine life or go play with children at the playground. There’s also a Mini Steam Express train ride to thrill kids and give them a clue as to what life was like when steam trains abounded. Hire canoes, go scuba diving or snorkelling. Take a wildlife cruise too to see seals and dolphins swim.

There’s also Pink Lake, another mind-blowing local attraction together with the Fitzgerald National and Cape Le Grande National Parks.  Both offer 4WD tours along the island’s coast. Further inland, lies the Telegraph Farm on Esperance’s west, where you can spot deer, camel, emu, buffalos and kangaroos.

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